Heirloom Meals: Savoring Yesterday's Traditions Today

Wednesday January 27, 2010

Heirloom Breeds & Seeds:
Sustaining Berkshire Grown

Berkshire Grown's mission is to support our local farmers and promote locally grown food, which results in strengthening our local economy and preserving open spaces.   It's a winning mission and one that I support whole-heartedly!

Last night I hosted the newly formed Development Committee for Berkshire Grown.


Our goal is to make Berkshire Grown "sustainable" without state funding.  In 2010 we have to do without a $50,000 state grant. And personally, I think that is OK.  We just need to do and think differently.

Our goals are to run events that are meaningful and in line with our objectives of helping farmers connect with food buyers - both restaurants through the farm to table program; and people through farmers markets and CSA's.  We need to reach out to the community and build membership, and pursue corporate sponsors who want to align with our message.  Restaurants play a key role for Berkshire Grown.  Their commitment to buying local ingredients and serving them is critical to the sustainability of our local small farms and our local economies.  If you are a local or own a second home in the Berkshires, please consider sending a donation to preserve the connection between farmers and eating.  I do.  I do it through my membership to Berkshire Grown (www.berkshiregrown.org), my membership to 2 CSA's (www.indianlinefarm.com and www.farmgirlfarm.com), raising my own chickens for meat and eggs, and using my land to raise Scottish Highland Cattle for grass fed beef for my family's consumption and ultimately for sale.

Food glorious food!  Don't we all live for that? Don't we all want to put what's best in our bodies and lower our carbon footprint?  If you answer YES - then support Berkshire Grown or support your local farmers wherever you live -  DO IT TODAY!!

And, yes I did serve food.  Our meal consisted of organic rice, chicken breast with chick peas and tomatoes and a green salad.  Laura Meister (Farm Girl Farm) brought chocolate chip cookies and local ice cream.



Chicken with Chick Peas and Tomatoes 
2 whole boneless chicken breast, cut into 8 pieces
4 garlic cloves, pressed
1/4 cup olive oil
1 Tablespoon Smoked Paprika
1 Teaspoon Cumin
1/2 Teaspoon Red Pepper Flakes
1 cup minced cilantro
1 cup plain yogurt (I like 2% greek but any will do!)
1 can chick peas
1 can of diced tomatoes (I use Muir Glen)

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Mix the garlic, oil, paprika,cumin, red pepper flakes. Spoon 1 tablespoon in the yogurt and set aside.  Place chicken in a baking dish and spoon 1-2 tablespoons of the spice mixture on the chicken.  In a bowl, mix the chick peas, tomatoes, remaining spice mixture and 1/2 cup cilantro.  Pour over chicken.  Bake for 30-40 minutes.  Serve over rice with a dollup or two of yogurt and sprinkle with cilantro. Enjoy!!

Sunday January 24, 2010

Ms Murky Mondays:
Immersion Blenders - A Cook’s Best Friend

My friend Joanna recently told me that she wanted an immersion blender for her birthday but she didn't know which one to buy.  And as you might imagine, I immediately told her which one I purchased, and why.  But I know there are a few great models out there - so Joanna - this review is for you!!





Breville BCS500XL 9.6 Volt Cordless Immersion Blender with Recharging Base

This is the immersion blender that I use.  One of the main considerations for me was the convenience of a cordless immersion blender.  I have limited counter space near my stove where I predominantly use it.  It does the trick for me but its controls are sensitive and finicky, and sometimes stalls out.  I, of course, have figured how to outwit it but it may frustrate others.  I think if you can live with a corded model, I would get a different one.  You can buy this model at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Breville-BCS500XL-Cordless-Immersion-Recharging/dp/B000MDASFC

 



SmartStick Brushed Chrome Hand Blender 


by Cuisinart
I figure when a model is back-ordered due to overwhelming demand and the majority of the reviews are raves, AND if the price is compelling, look no further....Here are the features according to the manufacturer:
 



 

  • Powerful 200-watt motor handles more blending tasks



  •  

  • Stick design reaches into pots, pitchers and bowls to extend blending options



  •  

  • Ergonomically designed grip offers comfortable hold and more control while blending



  •  

  • Operates with a one-touch control for easy, one-handed blending






  •  
    KitchenAid® Immersion Blender
    Here are the benefits according to the manufacturer:



    • Variable speeds provide greater processing control that adjusts to handle a variety of foods, beverages and soups.
    • The premium stainless steel blending attachment reaches an 8-inch immersion depth.
    • The stainless steel splashguard covers the blending blade to prevent splattering of ingredients.
    • The stainless steel whisk maximizes air in mixtures for fluffier egg whites and whipped cream.
    • The 4-piece chopper attachment quickly chops herbs, vegetables, fruits, cooked meats, nuts and cheese.
    • 5-ft. power cord provides exceptional freedom to move around the kitchen.
    Most of the Kitchenaid reviews were extremely positive.  I think these new models have a lot going for them - the 8" immersion depth, for one.  And they have made the power cords longer if you can live without the cordless.  Some of the Kitchenaid models come in fun colors like red.  The one I would have on my wish list, if price were not a concern can be purchased at www.surlatable.com  http://www.surlatable.com/product/id/131824.do#

    Sunday January 24, 2010

    Carole’s Concoctions:
    The Organized Cook - Must Haves in your Pantry, Spice Cabinet and Fridge/Freezer

    I realize that sometimes the obvious is not so obvious.  And for me, it is very obvious to keep certain items on hand at all times in my kitchen so I can whip up breakfast, lunch or dinner.  I also have a very organized mind when it comes to cooking and menu planning.  While I do enjoy grocery shopping, I know it is chore for some. So I thought I'd share some of my thoughts on weekly menu planning and then provide a list of items to keep in your larder.

    I generally do my shopping on Saturday morning.  The first thing I do is look in my pantry, fridge, and spice cabinets for items that I am "out" of that I need to replenish.  Then I think about meals for the next 6-7 days. What did we eat last week?  Will I be traveling this week and need to make extra so there are plenty of leftovers for Jim?  I like to eat a balance of meat, poultry, fish, pork and lamb with leafy greens and vegetables. I decide that we'll eat lamb, shrimp and chicken this week.  Then I think about how I might want to prepare them.  Right now it's winter and I love to make stews and braises.  Lamb works up nicely in a stew.  Shrimp would be perfect cooked in a risotto and chicken breasts can be done several ways but I know I don't need to decide.  If you can tell, these three meats will probably provide six nights of dinner.  My shopping list has the three meats, any vegetables that accompany the main meals - for the lamb stew - potatoes and green salad; for the risotto, broccoli or spinach; for the chicken, a green vegetable or two, some root vegetables etc.  To then re-invent the left-overs, I would make polenta with the lamb stew night two; I might add some asparagus to the risotto for night two; and with the chicken, I might turn it into a stir-fry - onions, garlic, peppers, diced chicken and rice.  My shopping list grows out of my menu.  But I don't need to buy everything because I already have many of the building blocks.

    Here's the list of must-haves for every organized cook:


    Spice Cabinet
    Salt ( regular, kosher and sea salts)
    Pepper (ground and pepper corns)
    Nutmeg
    Cinnamon (ground and sticks)
    Crushed Red Pepper
    Cayenne
    Cumin
    Bay Leaves
    Tarragon
    Thyme
    Curry Powder
    Chile Powder
    Cardamon
    Coriander (ground and seeds)
    Paprika (smoked, spicy, plain)
    Vanilla (extract and beans)
    Sage
    Marjoram
    Ground Ginger
    Cloves (ground and whole)
    Molasses
    Honey
    Cocoa



    Pantry
    Flour
    Sugars ( granulated, light and dark brown)
    Powdered Sugar
    Oats
    Cornmeal
    Pasta
    Rice (white, brown, risotto)
    Canned Tomatoes
    Canned Beans (chick peas, cannellini, red kidney)
    Lentils and Split Peas
    Chicken Broth and Bullion Cubes
    Bread Crumbs
    Mustard
    Vinegars ( red wine, cider, rice wine, tarragon, champagne)
    Oils (olive, canola, sesame)
    Shortening (I found some non-transfat organic)
    Raisins
    Chocolate Chips


    Bittersweet Chocolate bars
    Potatoes (russett and sweet)
    Onions
    Garlic
    Shallots
    Coffee (beans and instant)




    Fridge
    Milk
    Half and Half
    Heavy Cream
    Butter - sweet
    Eggs
    Plain non-fat yogurt
    Mayo
    Cheese - parm, romano, mozzarella, goat, cheddar, ricotta
    Capers
    Olives
    Lemons
    Limes
    Freezer
    Bread
    Organic Frozen Spinach, Corn and Broccoli
    Nuts (walnuts, almonds, pecans)
    Phyllo
    Puff Pastry
    Chicken Breast
    Sausage
     
     
     

    Friday January 15, 2010

    Heirloom Meals Radio:
    Cooking Chat

    Each week I co-host a radio show called Radio2Women with Serene Mastrianni. And Serene decided that she wanted to "interview" me.  We had a great time discussing how easy cooking really is.  The interview has inspired my next blog post....Alway prepared - must have spices, must have pantry and fridge/freezer items....so stay tuned!!

    In the meantime, listen to the interview here and get ready for Heirloom Meals Radio beginning in February!

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